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Carrot Diseases

Managing Alternaria Blight in Carrots

July 2000 June 2004;

Contact: Barbara Hall

VG00014 -- Project summary

Several strategies effectively controlled carrot seedling fungal disease, Alternaria blight (Alternaria radicina), during 2000 - 03 trials. Previous investigations of poor seedling establishment in carrots showed the cause to be Alternaria blight  (VG98100- Project Summary)

Alternaria blight, which is seed-borne, causes seedlings to establish poorly and die. Fungicide drenches applied to carrot umbels before infection, seed treatments (steam, potassium permanganate soaks and hydrogen peroxide baths) and biological control using a fungal antagonist were effective, and further research was recommended.

This project was funded by the Vegetable Industry levy with matched funding from the Australian Government facilitated through Horticulture Australia Limited (HAL).

A full report of this research can be obtained from HAL (external link) (Project VG00014 and VG98100)

The following articles are in PDF format, and require Adobe Acrobat Reader.

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Carrot News

A newsletter produced during the project provided information on research into carrot seedling diseases in South Australia. 

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Developing and communicating management strategies for controlling Carrot Virus Y (CarVY)

Contact: Barbara Hall

Carrot virus Y (CarVY), a devastating disease of carrots, has recently been found in high levels in SA. In the Virginia area it has been detected at levels up to 60% in harvested carrots and 98% in seed crop carrots in the south east of SA. At the completion of this work, it is anticipated that practical control strategies will be available for affected growers.

CarVY causes stunting, chlorosis and marginal necrosis or reddening of the leaves, and plants may have a feathery appearance. Early infection can cause distortion and knobbiness of the roots, a condition which has been referred to as "lumpy bumpy". The virus is transmitted by seed or aphid (green peach aphid), and has only been found to affects carrot species.

A multi state project led by Western Australia researched a multi-faceted, robust, cost-effective integrated disease management (IDM) strategy for sustainable management of CarVY in carrot crops, disseminated to the carrot industry nationally. The project determined the main aphid species associated with CarVY epidemics in WA, SA and VIC and found that all carrot varieties are susceptible.

This project was funded by the Vegetable Industry levy with matched funding from the Australian Government facilitated through HAL.

A full report of this research can be obtained from HAL (external link) (Project VG01016)

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